“There are fewer and fewer large turkeys”, says a specialist

Your traditional holiday turkey will cost you even more this year due to the bird flu affecting several farms across the country. The size of the turkey will also be smaller.

• Also read: Butter, turkey, eggs: Christmas dinner can cost a lot more this year

Sylvain Charlebois, a food industry specialist at Dalhousie University, expects a 10 to 15% increase in the price of turkeys in the coming months. He also explains that consumers will need to consider another factor before purchasing their turkey.

“The most important factor is that fewer large turkeys are expected. […] There are fewer and fewer large turkeys. This year people will probably buy two small turkeys. A kilo of turkey can cost more,” he says.

Mr. Charlebois explains that the industry has had to adapt to consumer buying trends in recent years.

“The industry knows that during the holidays we have fewer and fewer large groups, families have shrunk. 20 years ago, large 25 pound turkeys sold well […] today it is more and more rare,” he says.

In addition to the virus, the price of feed distributed to animals has increased dramatically in the past year.

Sylvain Charlebois points out that another important product will be exposed to price increases.

“On average, we’re talking about a 14 to 15% increase in the country. It’s the same in Quebec. Bird flu could affect prices in the coming weeks. We could expect a 10% increase,” he said.

Among the other foods affected by these price fluctuations is butter. On average, it sells for between $7 and $8 per pound.

But banners like Metro are selling the butter at $3.97/lb until Wednesday.

“It’s really a good deal,” said the food industry specialist.

The presence of bird flu is significant in several Canadian provinces. In Quebec, studies regarding cases of the disease are smaller.

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